Connections@CruciformChurch.Org 954.591.7801 5900 Dewey St. Hollywood, FL. 33023
 
  • 25 September 2020

    Acts 3:1-10 was recorded by Luke in order to build confidence in us that what is impossible with men is possible with God. In a sentence, I’d summarize this idea by saying, “God meets our natural limits with His unlimited power as we tarry in prayer and are continuously filled by His Spirit.”

  • 25 September 2020

    “Doctrine that can’t be dismissed. Demonstration that can’t be denied. Powerful preaching and persuasive power. This is the outcome of the people of God being filled with The Spirit of God and living in it’s overflow.”

  • 25 September 2020

    Here in Acts 2 Peter takes the stand as a witness of what God in Christ has done. Through the testimony of Peter we find that, “a witness of Jesus helps people understand what they’re experiencing in light of what God has done in Christ and calls them to respond.”

  • 25 September 2020

    “After many centuries of waiting… the people of God are now in position to receive the promise of God. A promise that would bring with it empowerment, justice, and great faith. God has already given them glimpses of grace through various prophets. He’s parted sea’s, nourished the people miraculously with manna from heaven, and at this point He’d even given them the gift of salvation through the death of guiltless Jesus for guilty we.

    The disciples are living in a bit of a confusing and defining moment. They’ve just witnessed the greatest injustice known to man… The false imprisonment and execution of the innocent God-man… then the one they’re mourning for resurrects and shows himself to them after 3 day…”

  • 25 September 2020

    “From on high, our Father, saw our plight and promised to send down His Spirit with whom would come justice and peace..! Two clear markers of the kingdom, Christ’s Spirit and Christ’s shalom.”

  • 25 September 2020

    “As the second book Luke addressed to Theophilus (see Luke 1:3), Acts may originally have had no title. The Greek manuscripts title it “Acts,” and many add “of the Apostles.” The Greek word translated “Acts” (praxeis) was often used to describe the achievements of great men. Acts does feature the notable figures in the early years of the church, especially Peter (chaps. 1–12) and Paul (chaps. 13–28). But the book could more properly be called “The Acts of the Holy Spirit through the Apostles,” since His sovereign, superintending work was far more significant than that of any man. It was the Spirit’s directing, controlling, and empowering ministry that strengthened the church and caused it to grow in numbers, spiritual power, and influence.”